September12014

betype:

Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design’s Golden Age

No one person ever invented an alphabet,” wrote Type-maven Tommy Thompson. Script typefaces were no exception. During the letterpress era they were in such great demand that many people “invented” them, and many others copied them. In some commercial printing shops, composing cases filled with scripts were stacked floor to ceiling to the exclusion of other type. Printers routinely amassed multiple styles of the heavy metal type fonts, each possessing a distinct twist, flourish or quirk, used to inject the hint of personality or dash of character to quotidian printed pieces. Fonts had names like Wedding Plate Script, Cursive Script, Engravers Script, Bank Script, Master Script, French Script, Stationers Semiscript and Myrtle Script — Myrtle? — there were countless others. They surfaced in Europe and America. And the exact same types in France, for example, could be found in Italian foundries with different names.

Scripts signaled propriety, suggested authority yet also exuded status and a bourgeois aesthetic. The wealthy classes couldn’t get enough fashionable scripts in their diet. Likewise, the nouveau riche embraced them too — maybe it helped them to appear even more wealthy. 

Seen in everything from wedding invitations and birth announcements to IOUs, menus, and diplomas, script typefaces impart elegance and sophistication to a broad variety of texts. Scripts never go out of style, and the hundreds of inventive examples here are sure to inspire today’s designers. Derived from handwriting, these are typefaces that are stylized to suggest, imply, or symbolize certain traits linked to writing. Their fundamental characteristic is that all the letters, more or less, touch those before and after. Drawn from the Golden Age of scripts, from the nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century, this is the first compilation of popular, rare, and forgotten scripts from the United States, Germany, France, England, and Italy. Featuring examples from a vast spectrum of sources—advertisements, street signs, type-specimen books, and personal letters—this book is a delightful and invaluable trove of longoverlooked material. 275 illustrations, 254 in color

USA: http://amzn.to/18ou7s9
UK: http://amzn.to/18F7HOd

August292014
August282014
August272014

huffingtonpost:

Jon Stewart’s Priceless Response To Fox News On Ferguson

Jon Stewart is back from vacation, and he’s not wasting any time going after one of his favorite targets: Fox News.

Watch his the full brilliant 10  minute monologue on racism and Ferguson  here. 

(via henriksaves)

8PM
wnycradiolab:

thekidshouldseethis:

Water Balloons Falling (and Bouncing) in Slow Motion.
Rewatch the video.

Well. That’s awesome.

wnycradiolab:

thekidshouldseethis:

Water Balloons Falling (and Bouncing) in Slow Motion.

Rewatch the video.

Well. That’s awesome.

8PM
fastcompany:

There’s one adjective that’s never used to criticize men, yet it shows up at an alarming rate in women’s performance reviews.
Read More>

fastcompany:

There’s one adjective that’s never used to criticize men, yet it shows up at an alarming rate in women’s performance reviews.

Read More>

2PM
mentaltimetraveller:

Willem de Kooning

mentaltimetraveller:

Willem de Kooning

August262014

todaysdocument:

fordlibrarymuseum:

"As a Republic dedicated to liberty and justice for all, this Nation cannot deny equal status to women."

On August 22, 1974, President Ford signed a proclamation designating August 26 as Women’s Equality Day. That date honored the incorporation of the Nineteenth Amendment, which guaranteed women the right to vote, into the Constitution on August 26, 1920.

In the proclamation President Ford noted his previous backing of the Equal Rights Amendment and his intention to continue supporting it. “Today I want to reaffirm my personal commitment to that amendment,” he stated. “The time for ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment has come just as surely as did the time for the 19th Amendment.”

Representatives Yvonne Brathwait Burke (D-Calif), Barbara Jordan (D-Tex), Elizabeth Holtzman (D-NY), Marjorie S. Holt (R-Md), Leonor K. Sullivan (D-Mo), Cardiss Collins (D -Ill), Corinne C. Boggs (D-La), Margaret M. Heckler (R-Mass), Bella S. Abzug (D-NY), Shirley Chisholm (D-NY), Ella T. Grasso (D-Conn), Patricia Schroeder (D-Colo), and Patsy T. Mink (D-Hawaii) attended the signing ceremony held in the Cabinet Room. First Lady Betty Ford and Anne Armstrong, Counsellor to the President, were also present for the signing.

In commemoration of Women’s Equality Day, the National Archives (usnatarchives)  is hosting a discussion in partnership with the Sewall-Belmont House and Museum

Women’s History on the Horizon: The Centennial of Woman Suffrage in 2020 

Tuesday, August 26, at 7 p.m. at the William G. McGowan Theatre

Can’t make it? The discussion will be streamed at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2t48I3j004.

(via fuckyeahhistorycrushes)

2AM
knowhomo:

knowhomo Reblog for R.A.’s and Teachers

GLSEN’S ICEBREAKERS
(read more HERE)
1) Common Ground - Source: Kerry Ashforth
Students and faculty advisors stand in a circle. One person begins by saying, “I’ve got a younger sister,” or some other statement that is true for them. Everyone for whom this is also true steps into the center of the circle. Everyone who doesn’t have a younger sister stays on the outside. You can always choose not to step into the circle. The game often brings up personal and important issues that students may not want to discuss in a more formal setting. This also allows us to recognize our differences and similarities.
2) Gender Stereotypes - Source: Various
Trace a male and a female body on butcher paper, then have a free-for-all where everyone writes/expresses as many gender stereotypes as they can think of, and place those stereotypes on the bodies where they would apply (i.e. “boys are smart at math” would be placed on the head of the male body). From here, you can talk about how gender stereotypes and traits relate to perceptions about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people - as well as how these stereotypes limit our possibilities, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. These exercises can also be done using stereotypes of gay men and lesbians - helping us to recognize that everyone has different traits that don’t define our sexual orientation or gender.
3) Culture Walk - Source: Kerry Ashforth
There are one or two mediators, and they begin by asking a group of people, for example, women, to move to one side of the room. The people who then haven’t identified as women ask questions, and the women give them answers. Then the women get to say what they’d like other people to know about them. You don’t have to “talk” or “walk”.
4) Pretzel, Knots - Source: various.
Group building cooperation game. Everyone stands in a circle. Everyone puts his right hand forward into the middle and grabs the right hand of someone. Then, take your left and hand grab the left hand of someone else in the circle. Thus, with your right hand you are attached to one person’s right hand, and your left hand is attached to someone else’s left hand. You are all now in a tangled ring of bodies. Without letting go, untangle yourselves. You may switch positions of your hands, but do not break the ring.
Sometimes the group is tangled in one big loop, but sometimes it is tangled in several smaller ones.

knowhomo:

knowhomo Reblog for R.A.’s and Teachers

GLSEN’S ICEBREAKERS

(read more HERE)

1) Common Ground - Source: Kerry Ashforth

Students and faculty advisors stand in a circle. One person begins by saying, “I’ve got a younger sister,” or some other statement that is true for them. Everyone for whom this is also true steps into the center of the circle. Everyone who doesn’t have a younger sister stays on the outside. You can always choose not to step into the circle. The game often brings up personal and important issues that students may not want to discuss in a more formal setting. This also allows us to recognize our differences and similarities.

2) Gender Stereotypes - Source: Various

Trace a male and a female body on butcher paper, then have a free-for-all where everyone writes/expresses as many gender stereotypes as they can think of, and place those stereotypes on the bodies where they would apply (i.e. “boys are smart at math” would be placed on the head of the male body). From here, you can talk about how gender stereotypes and traits relate to perceptions about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people - as well as how these stereotypes limit our possibilities, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. These exercises can also be done using stereotypes of gay men and lesbians - helping us to recognize that everyone has different traits that don’t define our sexual orientation or gender.

3) Culture Walk - Source: Kerry Ashforth

There are one or two mediators, and they begin by asking a group of people, for example, women, to move to one side of the room. The people who then haven’t identified as women ask questions, and the women give them answers. Then the women get to say what they’d like other people to know about them. You don’t have to “talk” or “walk”.

4) Pretzel, Knots - Source: various.

Group building cooperation game. Everyone stands in a circle. Everyone puts his right hand forward into the middle and grabs the right hand of someone. Then, take your left and hand grab the left hand of someone else in the circle. Thus, with your right hand you are attached to one person’s right hand, and your left hand is attached to someone else’s left hand. You are all now in a tangled ring of bodies. Without letting go, untangle yourselves. You may switch positions of your hands, but do not break the ring.

Sometimes the group is tangled in one big loop, but sometimes it is tangled in several smaller ones.

August252014

pbsparents:

Make your own thermometer with this neat science project!

See more Full-Time Kid with Mya here. 

(via pbstv)

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